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“NOT "THE" ROMULUS”
Review of Tempio di Romolo

Tempio di Romolo
Ranked #419 of 2,024 things to do in Rome
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Attraction details
Recommended length of visit: <1 hour
Reviewed 29 May 2017

This is not the Temple of the more famous Romulus, but for the son of Maxentius. It is accessible via the church it is attached to, but not through the forum entrance. These doors are said to be original and from the 4th Century and carry a nice patina finish. Interesting building design for Rome.

Thank SoCalOregonian
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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"forum tour"
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"open to the public"
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"romulus"
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Reviewed 4 October 2016

A temple (probably) dedicated to the deceased son of the Emperor Maxentius, not the Romulus of the legendary founding of Rome. The massive original bronze doors (now a green patina) sit between two porphyry columns, giving you a tiny glimpse into how ornate and grand these structures were. Inside (view accessible from the Basilica of Santi Cosma e Damiano) is a rotunda under a cupola.

Thank SpanishStepsApt
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 19 September 2016

Everything about this structure stands out. Among elements of particular interest are the bright blue-green bronze doors and the circular structure (still very much intact). The name has nothing to do with Romulus (one of the twins found by the she-wolf and founder of Rome) and everything to do with the son of Emperor Maxentius who died in 307 AD.

A church occupies space inside the temple these days but entry is impossible from the Forum side. The bronze doors adorn a concave facade (or at least what remains of the wings of the concave front). The doors and the locks still work, so says the guide.

The church of Santi Cosma e Damiano is on the back side of the Temple. There is a connection point between the church and the temple.

Niches on either side of the entry are partially bricked up; they would have held statues. Two beautiful green marble columns flank the door.

Sadly, this trip did not have adequate time budgeted for a visit to the church and an opportunity to view 6th and 7th century art. When touring, always try to leave something left unexplored so there will be a reason to go back. This is it!

Thank on_the_go_98765
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 3 May 2016

Historians think that originally the building was not a temple but the circular vestibule of access to the Temple of Piece, which was located at the large square arranged as a garden. In the 4th century, the Emperor Maxentius reused the vestibule of then abandoned area to dedicate the temple to his son Valerius Romulus. Later, it was used as a vestibule of the new Basilica of Saints Cosmas and Damian. It is an imposing structure with a striking bronze door.

Thank Borzov
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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Reviewed 5 April 2016

On Via Sacra, there are two structures that appear basically complete right next to each other. This rounded, 400 AD era temple was dedicated to "Divine Romulus," a son of Emperor Maxentius. The most striking feature are the bronze doors with red marble columns to the sides. Inside are some later period frescos & mosaics. Marble statues from several different Roman periods are also on display inside the small temple. Basilica Santi Cosma e Damiano, to the north, was added to the rounded temple at a later time.

Thank JT_Turner3
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC

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