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Medication

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Medication

I'm visiting Waikiki in September and after advice with my medication as I'm on Tramadol and need to know what I need to do. Thanks

19 replies to this topic
Oahu, Hawaii
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196 posts
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1. Re: Medication

You can fly with that.

Maybe your injury will be better by then, anyway.

Seattle
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21 reviews
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2. Re: Medication

You don't need to do anything special when it is your own medication prescribed by a doctor. There are no rules against that. Some people think it is better to keep it in the original packaging so it shows your name, doctor name, etc.

California
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3. Re: Medication

Agree with the others, just make sure you keep it in your purse/backpack and not inside your checked luggage. That sounds like common sense but I've heard stories of prescription meds being "lost" from checked luggage.

Oklahoma City...
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4. Re: Medication

Tramadol in a controlled substance in the US and be sure to follow all regulations when you bring it in. You don't want to risk having a medication you need being taken away at the border. below is a quote from the FDA about bringing medications into the IUS and a link.

"Q: What should travelers and visitors know about bringing medications into the U.S.?

A: When you come to the United States with medications, you fall under the authority of FDA, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents operating the nation’s airports. There are varying restrictions, and different agencies may have other requirements or jurisdiction over a product. So check with each agency before you plan to travel with medications into the country.

In general, you should have with you a valid prescription or doctor’s note—written in English—to bring medication to the U.S. The medication should be in its original container with the doctor’s instructions printed on the bottle. If you don’t have the original container, bring a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor explaining your condition and why you need this medication. Travel with no more than you need for your personal use during your stay. A rule of thumb: Bring no more than a 90-day supply of medication."

https:/…ucm484154.htm

Seattle
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5. Re: Medication

We don't know where Lynne S lives. Maybe she is already IN the United States, so this is just going between two different states, not international travel. She didn't say.

You do not need to travel with a "valid prescription" for your own medications.

You do not need a letter from your doctor explaining your condition.

Because it is a controlled substance, I agree, keep in your carry-on, and lock it up where you are staying if possible.

Edited: 20 June 2018, 07:06
Oklahoma City...
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6. Re: Medication

All prescription medications should be carried in their original container. The container will have the name of the doctor and dosing instructions. With the current focus on opiod abuse it would be very unwaise to carry a controlled substance in anything but it's original container.

I assumed she was from outside the US and I apologize for the confusion if she is not. Some medications can be bought OTC in other countries but require scripts here. If the poster or anyone else is bringing in such a medications, they should travel with a letter from their doctor. It they don't have one they risk having it taken away,

Seattle
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7. Re: Medication

<they should travel with a letter from their doctor. It they don't have one they risk having it taken away>

Do you have a website or reference that states that is the rule? I have never read or heard of this requirement before. Or been given one by my own doctor for international travel.

Edited: 20 June 2018, 07:50
Honolulu, Hawaii
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8. Re: Medication

My husband carrys a letter when he carrys medication that must be injected (pre-filled syringes). For anyother meds as long as it's in the original container with your info on it....no letter needed.

Chicagoland
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9. Re: Medication

Bring your medication in its pharmacy bottle. Keep it on your person. Bring enough for your whole trip. Pharmacists cannot by law fill any prescription for an controlled substance (opiate) that is not ordered by a doctor licensed to practice in Hawaii.

Oklahoma City...
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10. Re: Medication

If persciption medication is its original packing you don't need a letter. You don't need a letter for OTC medications purchased within the US. The information posted below is for entry into the US. When I travel internationally I always bring medications in their original packiagung, scrips and OTC and have never had a problem. I posted above but here it is again, with a link to the FDA website.

https:/…ucm484154.htm

"Q: What should travelers and visitors know about bringing medications into the U.S.?

A: When you come to the United States with medications, you fall under the authority of FDA, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents operating the nation’s airports. There are varying restrictions, and different agencies may have other requirements or jurisdiction over a product. So check with each agency before you plan to travel with medications into the country.

In general, you should have with you a valid prescription or doctor’s note—written in English—to bring medication to the U.S. The medication should be in its original container with the doctor’s instructions printed on the bottle. If you don’t have the original container, bring a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor explaining your condition and why you need this medication. Travel with no more than you need for your personal use during your stay. A rule of thumb: Bring no more than a 90-day supply of medication.

If you’re staying longer than 90 days, you may have additional medication sent to you by mail or courier. Include documentation showing that the medication is being sent for your own use while visiting the United States. This documentation may include: a copy of your visa and passport, a letter from your doctor, and a copy of your prescription (in English)."

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