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Real Skyr in the United States?

Phoenix, Arizona
Level Contributor
110 posts
Real Skyr in the United States?

High on my list of the the things I miss most about Iceland is the amazing, creamy, custardy goodness of skyr. I have tried the so-called "skyr" sold by Siggi's and Icelandic Provisions in the U.S., and it is much too tart and otherwise terrible. Does anyone know if authentic skyr is available in America, and where I can find it?

28 replies to this topic
Reykjavik, Iceland
Destination Expert
for Iceland
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14,663 posts
60 reviews
65 helpful votes
1. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

Apparently yes, and here you can find the location closest to you .... I hope :)

https://www.icelandicprovisions.com/

:)

Icelander in...
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for Iceland
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11,913 posts
26 reviews
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2. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

Yes: www.iseyskyr.com.

Phoenix, Arizona
Level Contributor
110 posts
3. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

Both of your links lead to skyr advertisements by a brand called "Icelandic Provisions." As mentioned in my original post, I have tried the skyr sold by Icelandic Provisions in the United States and it is terrible. I am looking for the real thing.

Reykjavik, Iceland
Destination Expert
for Iceland
Level Contributor
14,663 posts
60 reviews
65 helpful votes
4. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

Well, I guess you wouldn't be the first person to move to Iceland for Skyr.

Time to start your immigration process... ?

Edited: 28 March 2018, 12:55
Fredericksburg, VA
Level Contributor
1,049 posts
44 reviews
29 helpful votes
5. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

I'm with beachessuck. I was so thrilled to find Siggi's and sorely disappointed when I tried it. Then the upscale grocery store in town started carrying Icelandic Provisions - I thought this would be the answer! Nope. Neither is like the Skyr found in Iceland. So for anyone who hasn't tried Icelandic Skyr, please don't think that the brands available in the US are anything like the version available in Iceland. I brought about 12 pots of Skyr back with me the last time I traveled (in my checked luggage - it's ok with US Customs).

Seattle
Destination Expert
for Iceland
Level Contributor
1,331 posts
24 reviews
156 helpful votes
6. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

Interesting that the op and poster above found Icelandic Provisions to be noticeably different from the skyr that one would purchase in Bonus or Haggup. It tastes the same to me, but in searching about this I found out there are 2 versions of skyr.

There is KEA skyr and there is Isey skyr (formerly MS skyr):

https://www.ms.is/vorur/flokkur/kea-skyr/63

https://www.ms.is/vorur/flokkur/isey-skyr/62

Beside the different shape of the container, the main difference is this:

https:/…

I remember when the only skyr sold was the kea skyr, because all the containers were tub shapped and had the spoon on top. Several years ago, the different shape containers (isey skyr) showed up alongside the kea skyr.

Never thought much about it, as I believed the MS dairy was just just in the process of changing containers, but obviously it was a very different product. But both tasted the same to me, but as mentioned in the Grapevine link, they are produced differently.

As Icelandic Provisions is isey skyr, you must want the kea skyr that comes in the tub container.

Whole foods used to carry this, but I don't think they still do. However, they do have a link showing this on their website: wholefoodsmarket.com/product-brands/skyris

Hope you can find what you are looking for.

Bellingham...
Level Contributor
79 posts
7. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

This explains a bit more of the export story:

https:/…

Reykjavik
Level Contributor
2,237 posts
36 reviews
26 helpful votes
8. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

As an Icelander raised on “old-school” skyr at least twice a week I prefer Siggi’s skyr to most of the sugary, way-too-sweet options MS (the local provider) is offering. Even the skyr I got in Norway was higher in fat and lower in carbs/sugar than the Icelandic versions. The tartness is part of what skyr really is and IMHO some of the MS versions (Crème Brule and Banana Split come to mind…) are closer to desert-pudding than “skyr”.

Traditionally (as back in 1980… don’t have to go much further back than that) skyr was sold in a more solid state. Maybe mid-way between yogurt and a wet mozzarella. To prepare it you added a dash of water and/or milk and stirred it up to the consistency you wanted. Most people added sugar to the stir, and often a drop or two of vanilla essence. Luxury-versions you might stir in a raw egg. Once on the table each individual might sweeten his bowl to his taste and maybe add some berries and a cream/milk mixture.

If I plan on having skyr as a meal for my family I try to buy the “KEA óhrært skyr” as seen on the link shared above. That’s the closest you get to the old-type of skyr. “Óhrært” meaning unstirred so you need to follow the steps I mentioned above. Second place is the skyr in the blue boxes – that’s unsweetened skyr. These two have just under 4gr of carbs per 100gr versus 13 for most of the flavored types. They also have more protein (13 versus 11). All-in-all a healthier option, and once you adjust to the lower sugar a better tasting one too!

New York City, New...
Level Contributor
3,968 posts
296 reviews
205 helpful votes
9. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

I have tried both Skyrs (Siggi and Icelandic Provisions). While both taste good to me, I cannot compare it to the original Skyr as I have not been there. My wife has and she said both as not the same as the skyr over there although IP taste better than Siggi's. I will be there end of May., I guess I can update this thread then.

Seattle
Destination Expert
for Iceland
Level Contributor
1,331 posts
24 reviews
156 helpful votes
10. Re: Real Skyr in the United States?

My only experience with skyr in Iceland has been what I purchased in a grocery store there. So, for me, Icelandic Provisions tastes like the real thing.

Skyr always shows up at the breakfast buffet, but depending on hotel, it has been the store purchased containers, or a bowl of skyr prepared at the hotel.

I always thought skyr is skyr, but after reading Gestur's post, this is not the case. Skyr prepared in a hotel kitchen and placed on the buffet table can be substantially different from the store bought type.

So perhaps that is the taste posters to this thread are seeking to replicate. The truly homemade version.

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