Luxury Beach Hotels in New York City

THE BEST Luxury Beach Hotels New York City

Luxury Beach Hotels in New York City

Ocean views, beachside dining, cooling breeze...what more could you ask for?

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In New York City
#182 of 561 hotels in New York City

Luxury Beach Hotels nearby destinations

  • Brooklyn
    It seems like most folks have a grandmother, great-uncle or some other distant relative that used to live in Brooklyn, or perhaps a friend that lives there now. In the early 1900s, it was a mecca for immigrants arriving via Ellis Island. A hundred years later, young professionals and artists left pricey Manhattan digs for Brooklyn's cheaper and more expansive space. Neighbourhoods like Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope, which had fallen into disrepair over the years, were restored and reborn as funky enclaves. Walk or bike over the historic Brooklyn Bridge (or ride the subway) to Brooklyn Heights for a stroll along the Promenade and breathtaking views of the Manhattan skyline. Meander through Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens for a taste of nature in the urban wilds. Catch a performance at the world-famous Brooklyn Academy of Music. From the delicious Italian restaurants of Bensonhurst to the Irish bars that line the avenues of Bay Ridge, from the hotdogs and rollercoasters of Coney Island to the bagels and handball courts of Greenpoint, Brooklyn is a state of mind as well as a dynamic community. Discover why, no matter where people move on to, they remain Brooklynites at heart.
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  • Queens
    Queens is the most ethnically diverse area of its size on Earth, which means there's a little something for everyone. Chow down on Indian food, sit in on a traditional Irish pub music session, and dance the night away at a Puerto Rican nightclub, all of it located within a few subway stops. Queens is also the home of the Mets and the US Tennis Open, and the former home of the New York World's Fair, now Flushing Meadow-Corona Park, and Paramount Pictures, now the Museum of the Moving Image.
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  • Newark
    Known as New York's tough neighbour with a major international airport, Newark is a destination in its own right. The city is undergoing revitalisation efforts and its attractions include several large parks, art galleries and architecturally significant buildings. The Newark Museum is a complex of art and science exhibits, a mini-zoo, a planetarium and more. Theatre, music and dance performances take place at venues such as the New Jersey Performing Arts Center and Newark Symphony Hall.
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  • Long Branch
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  • Long Island

    New York welcomes huge numbers of visitors every year who are attracted to this iconic American city for its shopping, Broadway musicals, cuisine and breadth of visitor attractions. Long Island is situated to the south east of the city and includes the well known metropolitan boroughs of Queens and Brookyln. However, it also contains the more rural counties of Suffolk and Nassau which offer stunning beaches and an insight into the lives of the super rich.

    Greenport is a little harbour village in Suffolk County and exudes charm with its bustling marina, tall ships, and 1920s carousel. Kids will love checking out all the boats at Mitchell Park, as well as taking a spin on the historic carousel, and you can also hop onto a ferry for a quick trip across to Shelter Island, which is a safe haven for wildlife due to its large wetlands.

    Back in Greenport, make sure you check out the Railroad and Maritime museums which give an insight into the region’s historic past as a centre of whaling and ship building. Suffolk County is also famed for its wineries and there are several within close proximity to Greenport that offer wine tasting and tours. You can also sample the county’s fine wines in one of the local eateries which will be a perfect way to end the day as the sun sets over the harbour.

    The area known as The Hamptons is one of the most wealthy in the United States and is comprised of a series of picturesque seaside villages. It’s renowned for its popularity with A-list celebrities and the attraction of the area will become apparent when you see those blue skies and golden beaches and consider its convenient proximity to the Big Apple. If sunbathing and other beach-related activities are your thing, then you’ll be in paradise and, as you’d expect, there’s plenty of great restaurants and drinking establishments to choose from.

    Across in Nassau County you’ll find the spacious and hugely impressive Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park, which covers over 400 acres and features a stunning collection of greenhouses, gardens, and offers guaranteed colour and pleasant walks.

    Also within the boundaries of Nassau you’ll also find Sagamore Hill, which was the home of Theodore Roosevelt the 26th President of the United States. Built in 1884, it’s now listed on the National Register of Historic Places and tours are open to the public. Included within the premises is the Theodore Roosevelt Museum.

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Popular destinations for Luxury Beach Hotels

  • Salt Lake City
    Known for the stunning backdrop afforded by the towering Wasatch Mountains – and the endless opportunities for outdoor recreation they provide – Salt Lake offers visitors a uniquely vibrant and dynamic urban experience. As one of North America’s most accessible destinations, Utah’s capital city offers year-round excitement and activities for the entire family, alongside a contemporary edginess and vitality that’s helped the “new” Salt Lake become a renowned culinary destination.
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  • Cornwall
    Cornwall is the extreme southwestern peninsula of England. It has the longest stretch of continuous coastline in Britain and it is one of the sunniest areas in the UK. With picturesque villages, Celtic ruins, light blue waters, gardens and parks and unique architecture it certainly is among the most scenic areas of England. Home of many events and festivals and the land of Cornish pasty, it is definitely worth visiting.
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  • Mogan
    This resort area on the southern part of Gran Canaria has a laid-back, upscale vibe. You’ll find crystal-clear water perfect for snorkeling, a network of canals (which gave the town the nickname “Little Venice”), and a number of restaurants and bars along the pretty beach.
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  • San Sebastian - Donostia
    While many visitors come for the beaches, arts celebrations and fiestas, San Sebastian-Donostia is serious about its food and drink. The Old Quarter’s narrow, winding streets are full of bars and restaurants, and in the modern city, sidewalk cafes are all around. The city specialises in seafood. Just make sure you know not to expect dinner at 6 or 7 p.m.—that’s much too early in Spain. Instead, tide yourself over with tapas, and enjoy eating and drinking late into the night.
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  • Malaga
    Malaga, Pablo Picasso's birthplace and the gateway to the Costa del Sol, is a hectic, sometimes unruly city of 550,000. An impressive number of museums and monuments, including the 11th-century Alcazaba fort and Museu Picasso Malaga, provide plenty of diversions for those who opt not to spend all their time on the coast's famed beaches and in their accompanying bars. The old city bustles with taverns and bistros. The generous Paseo del Parque offers a delightful stroll past banana trees and fountains.
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  • Palma de Mallorca
    Palma, the economic and cultural hub of Majorca, is a delightful base for exploring the island's many gold and white beaches. A former Moorish casbah, or walled city, Palma's Old Town is an appealing maze of narrow streets that are a delight to explore on foot. Hop on the Soller Railway for a 17-mile scenic trip, visit 14th-century Bellver Castle and the museum of contemporary art, and check out the nightlife.
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  • Italian Riviera
    Liguria, or the Italian Riviera, boasts a bounty of beaches and resort towns, such as tiny Portofino and stylish Rapallo. Hiking trails lead from Portofino to the villages of Cinque Terre. The Riviera of the Setting Sun runs north from Genoa to the French border. Connected by an extensive rail network, most towns are an easy day trip from one another. Genoa is the region's principal city and is home to the famous Cathedral, the Palazzo Reale and an excellent aquarium.
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  • St. George's
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  • Midoun
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