History Museums in Wellington

THE 5 BEST Wellington History Museums

History Museums in Wellington

Museums
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What travellers are saying

  • Sandy H
    Gold Coast, Australia236 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Probably the best Museum I have visited. Fortunate enough to be here whilst the Gallopoli display it on… words can’t describe how amazing and outstanding the display is. Loved it so much I’m going back again tomorrow.

    Other exhibits were also interesting and lots of interactive display to keep children busy. I never knew a Kiwi bird doesn’t have wings..!! Never too old to expand one’s knowledge :)

    It’s definitely a must visit if in Wellington
    Written 4 May 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • jojo201587
    Auckland Central, New Zealand20 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    We managed to go on the second to last day of this amazing exhibition. The Quinns Post Experience was fantastic. Our tour guide was very knowledgable and passionate, and transported you back in time as she explained the history. A shame this exhibition was closing as I know of several people who would love to have gone to it.
    Written 4 December 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Robert T
    Hamilton, New Zealand22 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    While somewhat out of the way, the good little museum is well worth a look. It covers the early colonial history and latter industrial history of the Hutt valley, and has wonderful exhibitions.
    Written 6 August 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jamuel E
    Wellington, New Zealand218 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This an amazing hidden gem. And it shouldn’t be so hidden it feels tucked away in a corner. That would be my only downside.

    This is not a very big flashy exhibit but rather it is more an important one for anyone to visit to learn about one of NZ’s most important events in its history hence the 5 star review. It’s amazing to have these documents in wellington to look at and they have done well to tell the story and history around it. Can’t wait to be back to spend more time here.
    Written 8 November 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • on_the_go_98765
    Tucson20,631 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is not a "tourist" destination, it is more of a repository of New Zealand's most significant documents. To use the Public Reading Room, a "reader card" must be presented. To get one, there's a form to be filled out (looks like one has to be a Kiwi to get one). However, these are 2 of the most important documents from my perspective: The Women's Sufferage Petition and the Treaty of Waitangi.

    Women's Sufferage granted women the right to vote in the 1893 general election; US did not grant that right to American women until the 1920's.

    The Treaty of Waitangi of 1840 gave Maori the righs of British citizenship and protection from France and it recognized Maori ownership of their lands. This was done under Queen Victoria's reign and it sought to repay the Maori for confiscated lands. Between 530 and 540 Maori chiefs signed but disputes arose that simmered over and festered to become the New Zealand Wars of 1845-1872.

    At the end of the 27 year period of guerrilla-like battles, 18,000 British troops battled 4,000 Maori. Today, disagreements are settled in the courts ... but they are still on-going.

    These documents are as precious and as old as most that we Americans have in our National Archives. These are likewise the cornerstones of their national identity.
    Written 25 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kiwiconnection2016
    Wellington, New Zealand78 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Its not restored which to me was more interesting... we had a good visit and were amazed by the number of children born into this wee cottage that grew a little larger, a bit at a time.
    Everything is original, handmade furniture is lovely... well worth a visit.
    Written 18 September 2013
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Judi J
    2 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Blessed to have been able to visit the centre, and receive a personal tour with volunteer Elizabeth. Her knowledge was astounding and her love and compassion obvious. These are the stories that must be told! Yes, we hear anecdotal information here and there, but there is something life-changing in coming face to face with an original yellow star, a uniform, a child's artwork, a personal memoir. Highly recommended for young and old alike. Thank you for preserving these stories, so that we will not forget.
    Written 2 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • onitada
    Wellington, New Zealand229 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I was fortunate to have an arts studio (room 1) for a decade, as well as being a member of the Tramways Union for 13 years. So, I guess, my connections are rather more than superficial with this building and its museum.

    According to its website, The Wellington Trades Hall is a museum on Vivian Street, on the ground floor which showcases the history of the trade union movement in Aotearoa, and this it does to a tee. The building is also still operational with a number of unions still functioning out of its rooms. The website also has an excellent virtual tour.

    I attended the anniversary of the Trades Hall bombing an event held every year, highlighting the death of Ernie Abbot the custodian of the building, so things happen, it's a living and breathing museum.

    There are exhibitions that look toward the 1981 springbok tour, paintings of those dear to the Union Movement, a small film room. An Intune piano if you wish to belt out a union song or two. Don't forget to check out the lift. Pop in for a beer at Monkfish, after, or grab a meal from the eateries attached to the building.
    Written 29 April 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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