Caos Granitico

Caos Granitico, Machu Picchu: Address, Caos Granitico Reviews: 4.5/5

Caos Granitico
4.5
Points of Interest & Landmarks

Tours and Tickets


4.5
63 reviews
Excellent
30
Very good
24
Average
9
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Patrona59
San Angelo, TX12 contributions
2 weeks of Peru
Jul 2019 • Friends
Best trip! Loved Lima, Cusco, Sacred Valley...making it to the top of Machu Picchu the best feeling!
Written 22 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

ruthandvern
Wilton, CA14,197 contributions
Granite Quarry
May 2019 • Couples
The best shot I have is what I call the Unfinished Machu Picchu. Our guide showed how the stones were cut and moved and placed, having them in this locale certainly made the movement into place easier than it might have otherwise been. Mind boggling in the creativity and skill set.
Written 16 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Bob H
Mississauga, Canada17,282 contributions
Caos Granitico (Granite Quarry), Machu Picchu
May 2018 • Couples
The is the quarry used by the Incas used in the construction of Machu Picchu. The quarry stones are strewn about but when you look at the buildings within Machu Picchu you realized how much talent the Incas had to shape such rough stones.
Written 2 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

John D
Orlando, FL1,008 contributions
Is What It Is
Aug 2018 • Couples
Pulled some of the granite from this location to build parts of the site. Again...it's cool, but really elevating something above what it simply is to create interest. All these things put together make for an interesting story. On their own...they're just average in interest.
Written 24 August 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Brun066
Florence, Italy10,283 contributions
If you prepare yourself by reading something, you will look at this "granitic chaos" with greater respect.
Jul 2017 • Couples
The traveler going through the lands of the Incas, if he is sensitive enough, will catch the special relationship that this people had with the stone. This is not so much because of the constructions' size (the pyramids of Egypt are more large than any Inca construction) as for masonry: every Inca construction is almost a miraculous creation; or at least it's a creation that deserved a working time and a patience that isn't measured; thus makes to appear rough in comparison - as noted by a Spanish observer, Pedro Sancho, already in 1534 - even the most fine architectural creations of Greek and Roman antiquity.
Not only that: the stone is for the Incas the object of transformation, but it is also the tool of the transformation itself. Lack of metals causes that striking stones with other stones, is the essential of the work that leads to a perfect masonry.
That's right, the traveler rightly sticks his attention to the end products of this hard and tedious work of quarrying, stonecutting and polishing: the walls of cities, temples and houses. He doesn't pay much attention to the "reverse" of the process, at its first stage, that is, the quarries. This "granite chaos" of Machu Picchu is therefore probably the only chance the average traveler has to see, where the stone is born, which will then be so miraculously worked.
And the impression is obviously disappointing, as many of the comments on this attraction prove.
The only way, in my opinion, to appreciate it a little more, is to place it in the framework of the process I remembered. Maybe by reading, before or after the trip, some papers by Jean-Pierre Protzen, professor emeritus at Berkeley, on Incas quarrying and stonecutting. Among them, Protzen describes his experiments, aimed at replicating the ancient and forgotten techniques of this people. He has experimented with how and how long the blocks could be cut, sculpted and polished, using the boulders still present in two Inca quarries: Kachiqhata near Ollantaytambo, and Rumiqolqa, 35 Kms from Cusco.
After these readings, in my opinion, even the "granitic chaos" of Machu Picchu will appear in a new light, and you will look at it with greater respect.
Written 26 October 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Carolina
Tucson, AZ436 contributions
you could see where the stones came from!
Aug 2017 • Family
When you start descending into the citadel, you only see a section of the granite garden, once in the citadel itself, you can see how they worked the stones, and the huge remmants of the stones untouched by the centuries passed. Amazing to see that all the stones came from that part of the mountain.
Written 22 August 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

garywing
Surrey, Canada759 contributions
how the blocks were cut
Oct 2016 • Solo
Our guide Reve of G-Adventures, explained to us step by step how the stones were looked at, where the cuts to be made were notched and lines drawn to fracture the stones. The stones then worked y chipping and gradually made to fit like pieces of a large puzzle. Simply amazing work with very primitive tools of the time. Work like fitting these stones together probably could not be done any better today....using laser cutters!
Written 26 October 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Steven W
Sacramento, CA1,174 contributions
Amazing skill of days past
Sep 2016 • Couples
It's amazing to look over the quarry and see some of the process used to build the amazing structures of Machu Picchu. It's difficult to fathom how they managed to create such a majestic place using stones such as these.
Written 20 September 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

892glenl
Canberra, Australia88 contributions
The Wonder of Machu Picchu
Oct 2015
There are never enough adjectives to describe the wonder of Machu Picchu. Understanding that there are many small wonderful sites, such as Caos Granitico, that each needs its own attention and explanation, but it is the combination of all these sites that makes a pilgrimage to this Incan Citadel such a magnificent experience.
Written 14 September 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Susan D
Bengaluru, India376 contributions
Magnificent scenery!
Jul 2016 • Family
This is well worth the money and the physical effort you have to make. Truly once in a lifetime experience!
Written 20 July 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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